Spelling Bee preparation tips for German based English words

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Spelling tips for German based words:

The following spelling tips come from Merriam-Webster's Spell It! spelling bee preparation list for English words from German. These spelling tips apply specifically to the Spelling Bee Practice: Words From German spelling list for SpellQuizzer:
"Donít shy away from consonant clusters! German words often have combinations of three or more consonants that donít occur in thoroughly English words. Examples include ngst in angst, sch in schadenfreude, schn in schnauzer, and nschl in anschluss."

"A \k\ sound in a word from German is usually spelled with k at the beginning of a word or syllable (as in kitsch and einkorn) and often with ck at the end of a word or syllable (as in knapsack and glockenspiel)."

"A long i sound ( ī ) usually has the spelling ei in words from German, as in fraulein, Meistersinger, zeitgeber, and several other words on the list."

"The \f \ sound, especially at the beginning of a word, is sometimes spelled with v in German words as in vorlage. Other examples include the nonĖstudy-list words herrenvolk and volkslied."

"The letter z is far more common in German than in English. Note that its pronunciation is not usually the same as English \z\. When it follows a t, which is common, the pronunciation is \s\ as in spritz, pretzel, blitzkrieg, and several other words on the list."

"The \sh\ sound in words of German origin is usually spelled sch as in schadenfreude, whether at the beginning or end of a word or syllable. In schottische, you get it in both places!"

"A long e sound (\ē\) usually has the spelling ie in words from German, as in blitzkrieg and glockenspiel."

"The letter w is properly pronounced as \v\ in German, as you hear in one pronunciation of edelweiss and in wedel and Weissnichtwo. Many German words, however, have become so anglicized that this pronunciation has vanished. Most Americans, for example, say bratwurst, not bratvurst."

Click here to download the Spelling Bee Practice: Words From German spelling list for SpellQuizzer.

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